Learn to Scuba Dive in Cozumel!


NAUI Dive Training

NAUI Scuba Diver

This entry-level class consists of academic development via self study and instructor led classroom sessions, a series of confined water dives to help learn skills and build confidence and have fun, adventurous training dives. If you're looking for a quality Scuba Diving class that offers something more than a quick gloss-over of essentials, this is it. Classes are available per request.

OVERVIEW

Scuba Diver is the NAUI entry level scuba certification course.It provides the fundamental knowledge and skills to scuba dive.Upon successful completion of this course, graduates are considered competent to engage in open water diving activities without supervision, provided the diving activities and the areas dived approximate those of training.

PREREQUISITES FOR ENTERING THE COURSE

  • Age. Minimum is 15 years for Scuba Diver certification. (Junior certification for ages 12 –14 years is allowed).
  • Diver Certification. None required.
  • Prior Training. Students who hold credentials from the NAUI Passport Diver Program may, at the discretion of the instructor, be awarded credit for skills and knowledge acquired.

COURSE POLICIES

• Ratios. Standard ratios apply. (for DE the ratio is no more than 4 to 1). Specific open water supervision policies are detailed below.
• Hours.
Academic - 14 hours estimated.
Practical Application - 17 hours including not less than
10 water hours.
• Open Water Dives. The minimum number of open water dives is five. They may be all scuba dives or one skin dive and four scuba dives. No more than three scuba dives may be made on a single day during the course. Open water training may be completed in two days with a skin dive and two scuba dives on one day and two additional scuba dives on the other day. All open water training must take place during daylight hours.
• Daily Hours. No more than eight hours of training may be conducted during any one day.
• Depth. Sixty feet (18 m) is the maximum depth for any open water training dives during the course.
• Escorting. Certified assistants may escort students during surface excursions and exits, ascents and descents and may temporarily attend to remaining students while the instructor conducts a skill with other students. The maximum number of students allowed per escort during underwater tours is two.
• Touring. During the second or subsequent open water dives, pairs of students may be escorted on tours. The instructor must evaluate the following skills for each student before that student is allowed to tour with a certified assistant:
– Remove, replace and clear a regulator.
– Regain primary regulator from behind the shoulder.
– Mask clearing, including removal and replacement.
(In cold water environments when mitts and hood seals are used, confined water removal and replacement is sufficient.)
– Hover without support or significant movement.
– Give, recognize and respond appropriately to common underwater communications.
– In a stationary position at a depth of approximately 20 feet (6 m), share air in a controlled manner with another diver; be both the donor of air and the receiver of air.
– Monitor air supply and communicate amount remaining upon request.
• Navigation Exercises. Certified assistants may accompany students during navigational exercises or the students may be overseen by the instructor.
• Dives Beyond Those Required. No dives are to be interspersed between “required” dives. Following satisfactory completion of all dives required for certification, dives for the purpose of expanding the qualified diver’s experience may be overseen. Extra dives will be charged at a rate of $80 per dive.


Advanced Scuba Diver Course

At Deep Exposure we're happy to offer the NAUI Advanced Scuba Diver course in cozy Cozumel. We embrace NAUI's motto; "Dive Safety through Education." The Advanced Scuba Diver class is an excellent opportunity for divers to increase their knowledge and abilities, while gaining experience under the supervision of a NAUI professional. Read on to learn more about this excellent program.

OVERVIEW

This course is a continuing education certification course for certified divers. It is an enjoyable program of continued supervised experience designed to introduce divers to a variety of diving activities and to be taught entirely in an open water setting. Upon successful completion of this course, graduates are considered competent to engage in open water diving activities without supervision, provided the diving activities and the areas dived approximate those of training.

This course is appropriate for divers who:

  • Desire additional training.
  • Have moved from one diving area to another and desire local orientation.
  • Do not have, but wish to obtain, NAUI certification.
  • Desire orientation to a variety of diving sites and conditions.

PREREQUISITES FOR ENTERING THE COURSE

  • Age. Minimum is 15 years. (Junior certification for ages 12
    – 14 years is allowed. (See “Policies Applying to All Courses”: Age, Junior Certification.”)
  • Dive Certification. Certification as a scuba diver by a NAUI recognized agency is required. The instructor is to carefully screen and evaluate all prospective students to assure that they understand diving safety and possess the necessary skills to participate. Curriculum and skills from other NAUI courses shall be used to evaluate and improve the diver’s knowledge and proficiency if necessary.
  • Equipment. Students shall furnish and be responsible for the care and maintenance of their own diving equipment. The instructor shall initially assist the student in checking all student gear to insure it is adequate and in proper working order.

COURSE POLICIES

  • Ratios. Standard ratios apply (for DE the ratio is no more than 4 to 1). If dives are made to depths greater than 80 feet (24 m), the maximum number of students that shall accompany one instructor is four. If one or more active-status assistants are used, this maximum may be increased to eight.
  • Hours. Academic - six hours estimated. This includes an enrollment/orientation session, on-site discussions as necessary to prepare for a dive’s activity and a final session that includes an examination based on the academic subject matter presented during the course. The briefings for dives in this course are necessarily longer than those for Scuba Diver or Master Scuba Diver because of the “academic” discussions needed to support activities like search and recovery, light salvage, hunting and collecting, etc.
  • Open Water Dives. A minimum of six open water dives is required. A maximum of three dives per day shall be applied toward course requirements. At least two dives are to be deeper than 20 feet (6 m).
  • Deep Dives. No training dives are to be conducted in excess of 130 feet (40 m). No dives are to require actual stage decompression. However, simulated stage decompression may be added to the ascent of a no-required stop decompression dive. Any simulated decompression time spent deeper than 25 feet (7.6 m) must be included in the actual dive time. The instructor is to accompany students during the first training dive in excess of 60 feet (18 m).

SKILL REQUIREMENTS

• Perform selected basic scuba skills.
• Perform selected rescue or assist skills.
• Use dive tables to plan all dives.
• Record dives in log books.
• Navigate underwater.
• Use appropriate equipment to perform selected tasks.

ACTIVITIES

The required dive topic areas listed represents three separate dives of the minimum six required. The remaining dives can be combined or split as needed to fit the situation and meet student needs provided at least six separate dives are made:

Required Dives
• Navigation
• Night or low visibility diving
• Deep diving (130 feet/40 meters maximum depth)
Elective Dives
• Search and recovery
• Boat diving
• Light salvage (not available)
• Hunting and collecting
• Exploration and underwater mapping
• Non-penetration wreck diving
• Observation and data collection
• Diving in surf or currents
• Altitude diving (not available)
• Salt water diving (in areas where most diving is in fresh water)
• Fresh water diving (in areas where most diving is in salt water)
• Shore diving
• Diving for photos or video
• Using dive computers

PROCEDURES FOR OPEN WATER

Sites. Whenever possible a variety of sites shall be dived.
Students are to prepare and present dive plans for each location and dive purpose. If a limited number of sites are available, the instructor can aid learning by creating varied meaningful dive tasks. Log book entries shall reflect the specific activities of the dives.
Briefings. Instructor led dive briefings and debriefings done in conjunction with the open water dives are required. The student divers shall fully participate in the dive planning process.
Content. Subjects and skills of importance for emphasis during briefings and dives include:
• Fitness, stress, individual limitations, fatigue, expo-sure and diving adaptations.
• Rough water, limited visibility, and dive/abort decision making.
• Weight use, suit compression compensation, breathing patterns as related to buoyancy control, and descent and ascent control.
• Dive planning, equipment preparation and care, and buddy diving. Each diver is to assume a leadership role on at least one dive.
• Communications, instrument use, and navigation.
• Environmental aspects and diving skills that minimally impact the environment.
• Rescues and assists (self and buddy), emergency systems and actions are to be reviewed and practiced.

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS

Academics presented during the course orientation, dive briefings and debriefings are to be used to enhance the safety, knowledge and appreciation of the dives made.


Master Scuba Diver Course

OVERVIEW

The course is a continuing education certification course for divers who wish to increase their understanding and enjoyment of diving. Emphasis is on student participation and practical application of knowledge in open water after a classroom discussion of subjects. This course is an excellent progression toward NAUI Leadership roles. Some subject areas are a review and expansion of material from previous courses. Each subject area is a progression in study not a definitive study in the particular diving activity. However, instructors will specify performance objectives for related course diving activities, for example, during a navigation dive the student will swim a reciprocal course to within 10 feet (3 m) of its origin. The course may be divided and taught in sections with the student’s Diving/Training Log being signed off for each activity until all requirements are met. Upon successful completion of this course, graduates are considered competent to engage in open water diving activities without supervision, provided the diving activities and the areas dived approximate those of training.

PREREQUISITES FOR ENTERING THE COURSE

• Age. Minimum is 15 years.
• Diver Certification. NAUI advanced certification or the equivalent is required. The instructor is to ensure adequate student knowledge and capability before any open water training and shall use skill or other evaluations to do so.
• Equipment. Students shall furnish and be responsible for the care and maintenance of their own diving equipment. The instructor shall initially assist the student in checking all student gear to insure it is adequate and in proper working order.

COURSE POLICIES

• Ratios. Standard ratios apply (see “Policies Applying to All Courses”). If dives are made to depths greater than 80 feet (24 m), the maximum number of students that shall accompany one instructor is four. If one or more active-status assistants are used this maximum may be increased to eight.
• Hours. Academic - 23 hours estimated. This includes classroom sessions and on-site discussions, briefings and debriefings as necessary to prepare for or conclude a dive’s activity in confined or open water.
• Deep Dives. No dives are to require actual stage decompression.
• Open Water Dives. A minimum of eight open water dives is required. A maximum of three dives per day shall be applied toward course requirements. No more than one skin dive may count toward the eight dive minimum.
• Deep Dives. No training dives are to be conducted in excess of 130 feet (40 m). No dives are to require actual stage decompression. However, simulated stage decompression may be added to the ascent of a no-required stop decompression dive. Any simulated decompression time spent deeper than 25 feet (7.6 m) must be included in the actual dive time. The instructor is to accompany students during the first training dive in excess of 60 feet (18 m).
• Projects. Assignment of independent projects outside of classroom may be utilized to enhance the learning of the students.

SKILL REQUIREMENTS

Skill requirements shall be targeted toward the specific activities of the dives conducted and shall be performed at a level significantly higher than that expected of divers at previous levels. The following considerations can be utilized in determining required dives and associated skills:

• Sites. The greatest possible variety of diving situations shall be used, such as: boat, shore or dock; lake, ocean, quarry, reservoir, or river; surf, or current; weeds, kelp, sand, reef, wreck, rock, mud and so on.
• Dives. Open water diving activities shall follow as closely as possible after the academic preparation on the subject and include those listed below. The required dive topic areas listed represents five separate dives of the minimum eight required. The remaining three dives shall be planned by choosing from that list, from the electives listed or from interest areas of the class. Dive topics may be combined or repeated to complete the minimum of eight open water dives:

Required Dives:
Emergency procedures and rescue
Deep/simulated decompression diving
Limited visibility or night diving
Underwater navigation
Search and recovery – light salvage
Elective Dives:
Skin diving
Review of basic scuba skills
Environmental study or survey
Air consumption (practical application)
Boat diving
Shore diving
Hunting and collecting
Special interest

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS

• Applied Sciences - This area is a review and continuation of the material covered in the NAUI Scuba Diver and Advanced Scuba courses. Included are physics, physiology, medical aspects and fitness. Emphasis must be placed on the applied aspects, so that the diver is able to perform diving skills and tasks involving buoyancy control, pressure changes, air consumption and personal limitations.
• Diving Equipment - this area reviews and expands upon the information presented in the Scuba Diver Course by covering the care of equipment, detailed functioning, specialized
gear and applications, plus additional gear to be used in the Master Diver Course. Technical information on scuba mechanics may be included.
• Diving Risks - This is to cover rescue, first aid and emergency procedures as applied to diving in open water. Underwater communications, orientation and navigation, the environment, dive planning and safety measures, including the benefits of emergency oxygen first aid, are also to be covered. First aid is to include the definition, types, cause, prevention, signs, symptoms and care of: shock, wounds, drowning, heart attack, fractures, sunburn, overheating, exposure, hypothermia, lung overpressure injuries, decompression sick-ness and seasickness. Rescue training is to include problem recognition, diver assists, rescues, in-water rescue breathing techniques, transports, carries and an orientation to CPR.
• Diving Environment-This area is to provide the diver with a better understanding and appreciation of both the physical and biological aspects of the environment which affect or en-gage the diver. Coverage is to include: plant and animal identification, relationships, dangers, regulations and uses; conservation, preservation and pollution; water movement and characteristics; shore, bottom and surface conditions; and diving locations.
• Underwater Navigation-This area provides the diver with the skills needed to use a compass and natural aids for orientation in order to: establish relative position, swim in pre-scribed directions for set distances and find particular locations while submerged and at the surface.
• Limited Visibility Diving-This area prepares the diver to function safely and effectively in dirty water or at night. The problems, techniques, skill levels, hazards and safety procedures are to be covered.
• Search and Recovery-This area provides the diver the information and training needed to select an appropriate search pattern and method for a given area and then perform a search using proper techniques. The problems, planning, methods, techniques and equipment are to be covered.
• Light Salvage-This area prepares the diver to recover intermediate-sized objects with limited or basic equipment. Theory, problems, hazards, methods, gear, rigging, calculations and principles involved are to be covered.
• Deep and Simulated Decompression Diving - This area enables the diver to anticipate and prevent problems, utilize concepts, methods, and equipment used in this type of diving. The diver is to acquire a thorough knowledge of the dive tables. Deep diving in this case is defined as any actual or simulated dive made between 60 and 130 feet (18 and 40 m).


NAUI Rescue Scuba Diver

Deep Exposure feels that by far this is one of the most important courses that you can take as a diver. The knowledge received in this course is worth its weight in gold. We strongly feel that you or your dive buddy should be proficient in scuba rescue...you just never know.

OVERVIEW

This course trains divers in the knowledge and skills needed to manage risks and effectively handle limited in-water problems and diving emergencies. Included are: assists, transports, surface rescues and rescues from depth involving both boat and shore based skin and scuba divers. The course meets the prerequisite rescue training for Skin Diving Instructor, NAUI Assistant Instructor, Divemaster, and Instructor certifications. Note: Adult CPR training (approximately four hours) meets the requirement for Scuba Rescue Diver certification.

However, additional CPR training that includes two person CPR and the use of rescue breathing barrier devices, e.g. pocket mask®, face shield, is required to meet the requirements for NAUI leadership certification.

QUALIFICATIONS OF GRADUATES

• Graduates are considered competent to perform assists and rescues in open water provided the diving site and diving situations approximate those of the course.
• Graduates may use this certification as a prerequisite for the NAUI Training Assistant Specialty Course, Leadership Courses and Instructor Courses.

FIRST AID AND CPR TRAINING

• First Aid and CPR instructors who present training in these respective skill areas during this course need not be NAUI Instructors.

COURSE PREREQUISITES

• Training and experience equivalent to NAUI Scuba Diver.
• If accredited First Aid and CPR certification are not offered as part of the course, current certification in both is required for certification.
• Open Water. A least one session is to be conducted in open water. An open water session involves one or more skin or scuba rescue exercises.

SKILL REQUIREMENTS (open water)

• On the surface, identify the problem and properly assist a completely equipped skin or scuba diver simulating each of the following: a muscle cramp, rapid shallow breathing, exhaustion, signs of pre-panic and breathing difficulties (due to suit constriction, cold water, etc.).
• Perform a satisfactory, controlled Scuba Diver Rescue. (see “Details of Selected Skills”) from approximately 20 feet (6 m) of water and transport, one-on-one, the simulated victim 50 yards (46 m) to shore, boat or platform removing gear as appropriate for extrication of the victim from the water.
• With the aid of one assistant, remove a diver simulating a non-breathing unconsciousness victim from the water after reaching the water’s edge, boat or platform.

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS

The following topics shall be covered:
• Causes and prevention of diving accidents: physical conditioning and physiological factors, stress and psychological factors, stress and the panic syndrome in self and others, recognizing distress, pre-dive equipment checks and surface drowning syndrome.
• Diving rescue: self-rescue, diver assists, surface and underwater rescues, diver transport, in-water rescue breathing, gear removal techniques, boat and shore extrication techniques, first aid applications and oxygen usage.
• General accident management: victim care and positioning, access to emergency transport/assistance and hyperbaric chambers, information collection and transmittal, accident reporting, liability and related legal considerations.


NAUI Enriched Air Nitrox Diver

OVERVIEW

This is course is to provide the diver with the information necessary to utilize EAN as a breathing medium. The class may be taught as a stand-alone specialty course to certified divers or the knowledge and skills training may be integrated into the NAUI Scuba Diver course.

QUALIFICATIONS OF GRADUATES

Upon successful completion of this course, graduates are considered competent to utilize EAN in open water diving activities without direct supervision, provided the diving activities and the areas dived approximate those of training.

SKILL REQUIREMENTS

At least two dives are to made using EAN, one of which is to be a repetitive dive. The student is to analyze his or her own breathing mixture and to plan and safely execute each dive.

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS

The following topics are to be covered: history of nitrox as a breathing gas; Dalton’s law of partial pressures; physiology of oxygen and nitrogen; depth limits, advantages, disadvantages and risks of nitrox; oxygen toxicity; hazards and pre-cautions of handling oxygen; the concept of Equivalent Air Depth; use of EAN with Standard Air Dive Tables; common gas mixing procedures; and gas analyzing procedures.

THE EANx ADVANTAGE

Unlike many sources for enriched air Nitrox training, Deep Exposure is a recommended source for nitrox training by the authors of “NAUI Nitrox: A Guide to Diving With Oxygen Enriched Air.” Additionally, we’re heavily involved in the development of the soon to be released book on mixed gas diving in conjunction with authorities like Dr. R. W. Hamilton, J. S. Silverstein & Capt. Billy Deans. Why settle for an instructor with a basic Enriched Air Diver certification and a few nitrox dives when you can train with highly qualified and experienced instructors?


We speak English, Spanish, German & French
 
US toll free 1 (866) 670 2736, Cozumel Ph. 52 (987) 872 3621 Deep Exposure Dive Center on Facebook

About Uscozumel scuba divingThe Boatcozumel scuba divingThe Crewcozumel scuba divingThe Storecozumel scuba divingDive Trainingcozumel scuba divingPADI Recreationalcozumel scuba divingNAUI Recreational

Divingcozumel scuba divingRatescozumel scuba divingCozumelcozumel scuba divingAccommodationscozumel scuba divingPhoto Gallerycozumel scuba divingDiver Reviewscozumel scuba divingContact Uscozumel scuba divingHome

SITEMAP     STAFF